No internationals for transgender people

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The case of transgender athletes is at the center of the news. The International Rugby League took a stand on Tuesday, two days after the International Swimming Federation.

The IRL announcement means transgender people will not be able to attend the Women’s Rugby World Cup in England in November.

IMAGO/AAP

Transgender people will not be able to attend international women’s rugby league matches until a “full inclusion policy” has been put in place, the International Rugby League (IRL), the world governing body, announced on Tuesday.

This announcement comes two days after that by the International Swimming Federation, which decided to create an “open category” to allow transgender athletes to compete separately. IRL authorities said they need further consultation and research to finalize a new policy for 2023, citing a “legal, reputational and welfare risk” to the game and players.

Meanwhile, “players who have transitioned from male to female cannot play in international women’s rugby matches,” the IRL said in a statement.

“The IRL reiterates its belief that rugby league is a game for all and that anyone can play our sport.”

International Rugby League

The benefit question

International sports bodies are considering introducing regulatory action on the issue after the International Olympic Committee announced last year that it would let each sport determine how athletes could gain a “disproportionate advantage”.

This issue is fueling controversy between those who defend the right of transgender athletes to compete freely as women and those who believe they have an unfair physiological advantage. The IRL announcement means transgender people will not be able to attend the Women’s Rugby World Cup in England in November.

“The IRL reiterates its belief that rugby league is a game for all and anyone can play our sport,” she said. She sees it as her responsibility to find the right balance between each player’s right to participate and the risk perceived by other players, as well as “ensuring that everyone is heard fairly”.

The governing body said it was working with the eight countries that have qualified for the next Women’s Rugby League World Cup on a “future policy on the inclusion of transgender women in 2023” taking into account the “unique characteristics” of the sport .

The case of swimming

On Sunday, the International Swimming Federation (FINA) ruled that male-born athletes who have become female can only compete in women’s categories or set women’s world records if they become female before puberty.

According to his medical committee, men who become women retained advantages including “bigger lungs and hearts, longer bones, bigger feet and hands” that “are not lost from hormone suppression.”

On Monday, Caroline Layt, a former New South Wales transgender rugby player, reacted angrily to FINA’s decision, tweeting that she “discriminates against a minority group whose rights are already in the gutter”.

And athletics?

The President of the International Federation of Athletics Federations, Sebastian Coe, has hinted that his discipline could follow FINA’s position by introducing a stricter policy towards transgender athletes competing in women’s events.

“My responsibility is to protect the integrity of women’s sport”

Sebastian Coe, President of the International Athletics Federation

“My responsibility is to protect the integrity of women’s sport,” said Sebastian Coe, who was present at the World Aquatics Championships currently being held in Budapest on Sunday. “If we need to adjust the protocols in the future, we will,” he added, making it clear that he “would always stand on the side of justice” if pushed to choose between “justice” and “inclusion.” to choose.

International Athletics Federation rules require transgender women to have sufficiently low testosterone levels for at least 12 months prior to competition.

(AFP)


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